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Home > Images Dated > 2021 > June > 21 Jun 2021

Images Dated 21st June 2021

Choose from 5,898 pictures in our Images Dated 21st June 2021 collection for your Wall Art or Photo Gift. All professionally made for Quick Shipping.


George Scott Winslow, 1866. Creator: Edmonia Lewis Featured 21 Jun 2021 Image

George Scott Winslow, 1866. Creator: Edmonia Lewis

Edmonia Lewis is one of the most important American sculptors of the 19th century. The free-born child of an African American man and a Chippewa woman, Lewis was also known by her tribal name, Wildfire. After studies at Oberlin College and apprenticeships in Boston, she moved to Rome and joined a community of American expatriate artists. Portrait medallions like this one are extremely rare in her oeuvre.;The subject, George Scott Winslow, was the son of a merchant from a prominent Boston family

© Heritage Art/Heritage Images

Banjo created for Charles P. Stinson, late19th centruy. Creator: John H. Buckbee Featured 21 Jun 2021 Image

Banjo created for Charles P. Stinson, late19th centruy. Creator: John H. Buckbee

Charles P. Stinson's minstrel credits include working with Callinder's Georgia Minstrels, the World's Minstrels, and Harvey and Frohman's Minstrel Companies as a banjo player, actor, and drum major. He made his name through banjo competitions though, notably in an 1888 competition in Kansas City when he beat eleven white competitors to become the first known African American to win such a competition in a southern state.;After touring through the 1880s, Stinson returned to Pittsburgh and set up a studio teaching amateur musicians. He taught parlor music to his middle-class students eager to join banjo, mandolin, and guitar orchestras playing arrangements of popular songs. Through his role as a teacher, Stinson also sold student-level banjos to his students. This banjo likely made by J.H. Buckbee in New York was the result of a collaboration between Stinson and Buckbee to create banjos for Stinson to assemble and distribute to his students; a common arrangement in the late nineteenth century as the instrument became popular

© Heritage Art/Heritage Images

Lavender tweed swing coat designed by Arthur McGee, mid 20th-late 20th century Featured 21 Jun 2021 Image

Lavender tweed swing coat designed by Arthur McGee, mid 20th-late 20th century

Lavender wool tweed swing coat designed by Arthur McGee. The fabric has multi-colored wool woven flecks. The coat has a spread collar, full-length flared sleeves, and falls just below the knee. It closes at the center front neck with one (1) snap and one (1) large round metal decorative brooch-like button with a purple rhinestone at the center. The rest of the front center opening does not fasten. There is one (1) horizontal pocket sewn at the proper left front waist. Pleats are sewn at each underarm to create additional flare at the sides. The back is made extra full with a deep box pleat sewn at the center back just below the shoulders. The coat is fully lined in green silk satin. The body has an additional lining between the facing and the satin made from green wool. The linings of the body are not seamed to the interior bottom hem, but are instead left loose with a turned hem finish. The wool lining is slightly shorter than the satin lining. There are no labels. In 1957, Arthur Lee McGee (1933-2019) was the first African American designer hired to run a design studio on Seventh Avenue in the Garment District in New York City

© Heritage Art/Heritage Images