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Home > Images Dated > 2019 > January > 11 Jan 2019

Images Dated 11th January 2019

Choose from 1,004 pictures in our Images Dated 11th January 2019 collection for your Wall Art or Photo Gift. All professionally made for Quick Shipping.


Old Almshouses in the Kingsland Road Turned Into a Furniture Museum, c1935. Creator: Unknown Featured 11 Jan 2019 Image

Old Almshouses in the Kingsland Road Turned Into a Furniture Museum, c1935. Creator: Unknown

Old Almshouses in the Kingsland Road Turned Into a Furniture Museum, c1935. The Geffrye Museum of the Home on Kingsland Road in Shoreditch, north-east London, is housed in 18th-century almshouses which were built in 1714 by Sir Robert Geffrye, a former Lord Mayor of London and Master of the Ironmongers Company. The front facade, seen here, has a statue of him in the niche below the clock. From "Wonderful London, Volume 3", edited by Arthur St John Adcock. [The Fleetway House, London, c1935]

© The Print Collector/Heritage Images

Outside the Peoples Palace in the Mile End Road, c1935. Creator: Donald McLeish Featured 11 Jan 2019 Image

Outside the Peoples Palace in the Mile End Road, c1935. Creator: Donald McLeish

Outside the People's Palace in the Mile End Road, c1935. The People's Palace was the brainchild of philanthropist John Thomas Barber Beaumont (1774-1841), who wanted to bring culture to the East End by building a home for higher education. The building, designed by Edward Robert Robson, opened in 1887. From "Wonderful London, Volume 3", edited by Arthur St John Adcock. [The Fleetway House, London, c1935]

© The Print Collector/Heritage Images

The Grenadier in Wilton Mews, Where Coachmen Drink No More, c1935. Creator: Unknown Featured 11 Jan 2019 Image

The Grenadier in Wilton Mews, Where Coachmen Drink No More, c1935. Creator: Unknown

"The Grenadier" in Wilton Mews, Where Coachmen Drink No More, c1935. Public house in Belgravia, London, built in 1720 as the officers mess for the senior infantry regiment of the British army, the 1st Regiment of Foot Guards. The building was located in a courtyard of their barracks. It opened to the public in 1818 as The Guardsman, and was renamed in honour of the Grenadier Guards actions in the Battle of Waterloo (1815). It was frequented by the Duke of Wellington and King George IV. From "Wonderful London, Volume 3", edited by Arthur St John Adcock. [The Fleetway House, London, c1935]

© The Print Collector/Heritage Images