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Home > Images Dated > 2019 > January

Images Dated 2019 January

Available as Framed Prints, Photos, Wall Art and Gift Items

Choose from 1038 pictures in our Images Dated 2019 January collection for your Wall Art or Photo Gift. Popular choices include Framed Prints, Canvas Prints, Posters and Jigsaw Puzzles. All professionally made for quick delivery.


Interrogation of Aircrews; W.A.A.F. Help In This Work, c1943. Creator: Cecil Beaton Featured January Print

Interrogation of Aircrews; W.A.A.F. Help In This Work, c1943. Creator: Cecil Beaton

Interrogation of Aircrews; W.A.A.F. Help In This Work, c1943. The Women's Auxiliary Air Force (WAAF), whose members were referred to as WAAFs, was the female auxiliary of the British Royal Air Force during World War II. Its members did not serve as aircrew, but although they did not participate in active combat, they were exposed to the same dangers as any on the home front working at military installations. Among their duties were: crewing of barrage balloons, catering, meteorology, radar, aircraft maintenance, transport, communications duties including wireless telephonic and telegraphic operation. At its peak strength, in 1943, the number of WAAFs (members of the force) exceeded 180,000, with over 2,000 women enlisting per week. From "Wings On Her Shoulders", by Katharine Bentley Beauman, Late Fight Officer W.A.A.F. [Hutchinson & Co Ltd, London, New York, Melbourne, c1943]

© The Print Collector/Heritage Images

Physical Training at a Recruits Depot, c1943. Creator: Cecil Beaton Featured January Print

Physical Training at a Recruits Depot, c1943. Creator: Cecil Beaton

Physical Training at a Recruits Depot, c1943. The Women's Auxiliary Air Force (WAAF), whose members were referred to as WAAFs, was the female auxiliary of the British Royal Air Force during World War II. Its members did not serve as aircrew, but although they did not participate in active combat, they were exposed to the same dangers as any on the home front working at military installations. Among their duties were: crewing of barrage balloons, catering, meteorology, radar, aircraft maintenance, transport, communications duties including wireless telephonic and telegraphic operation. At its peak strength, in 1943, the number of WAAFs (members of the force) exceeded 180,000, with over 2,000 women enlisting per week. From "Wings On Her Shoulders", by Katharine Bentley Beauman, Late Fight Officer W.A.A.F. [Hutchinson & Co Ltd, London, New York, Melbourne, c1943]

© The Print Collector/Heritage Images

The Navys here. Cossacks rescue of British seamen from the Altmark., 1942 Creator: Unknown Featured January Print

The Navys here. Cossacks rescue of British seamen from the Altmark., 1942 Creator: Unknown

The Navy's here. The story of Cossack's rescue of British rescue of British seamen from the Altmark was heard throughout the world. It started with Mr Winston Churchilll's orders, Get the men and ended when the Cossack's boarding party called down to the prisoners below decks, The Navy's here'. Some of the Indian seamen rescued are here being interviewwed by Z.A. Bokhari of the BBC's Indian Service, 1942. From "Calling All Nations", by T. O. Beachcroft. [The British Broadcasting Corporation, Wembley, The Sun Engraving Co., Ltd., London and Watford, 1942]

© The Print Collector/Heritage Images