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Images Dated 2019 January

Choose from 1,038 pictures in our Images Dated 2019 January collection for your Wall Art or Photo Gift. All professionally made for Quick Shipping.


John Gilpin is found by the postboy from the Bell Inn, 1878, (c1918). Creator: Randolph Caldecott Featured January Image

John Gilpin is found by the postboy from the Bell Inn, 1878, (c1918). Creator: Randolph Caldecott

John Gilpin is found by the postboy from the Bell Inn, 1878, (c1918). The youth tries to grab hold of Gilpin's horse's bridle, and frightens it even more. John Gilpin was the subject of a comic ballad of 1782 by William Cowper entitled "The Diverting History of John Gilpin". The ballad, based on real-life character, describes how, on a journey to Edmonton (north in London), Gilpin, a draper, became separated from his wife and children after losing control of his horse, and ended up in the town of Ware, ten miles away from his intended destination. From "The Diverting History of John Gilpin", by William Cowper. [Frederick Warne and Co., London & New York, c1918]

© The Print Collector/Heritage Images

Interrogation of Aircrews; W.A.A.F. Help In This Work, c1943. Creator: Cecil Beaton Featured January Image

Interrogation of Aircrews; W.A.A.F. Help In This Work, c1943. Creator: Cecil Beaton

Interrogation of Aircrews; W.A.A.F. Help In This Work, c1943. The Women's Auxiliary Air Force (WAAF), whose members were referred to as WAAFs, was the female auxiliary of the British Royal Air Force during World War II. Its members did not serve as aircrew, but although they did not participate in active combat, they were exposed to the same dangers as any on the home front working at military installations. Among their duties were: crewing of barrage balloons, catering, meteorology, radar, aircraft maintenance, transport, communications duties including wireless telephonic and telegraphic operation. At its peak strength, in 1943, the number of WAAFs (members of the force) exceeded 180,000, with over 2,000 women enlisting per week. From "Wings On Her Shoulders", by Katharine Bentley Beauman, Late Fight Officer W.A.A.F. [Hutchinson & Co Ltd, London, New York, Melbourne, c1943]

© The Print Collector/Heritage Images

Physical Training at a Recruits Depot, c1943. Creator: Cecil Beaton Featured January Image

Physical Training at a Recruits Depot, c1943. Creator: Cecil Beaton

Physical Training at a Recruits Depot, c1943. The Women's Auxiliary Air Force (WAAF), whose members were referred to as WAAFs, was the female auxiliary of the British Royal Air Force during World War II. Its members did not serve as aircrew, but although they did not participate in active combat, they were exposed to the same dangers as any on the home front working at military installations. Among their duties were: crewing of barrage balloons, catering, meteorology, radar, aircraft maintenance, transport, communications duties including wireless telephonic and telegraphic operation. At its peak strength, in 1943, the number of WAAFs (members of the force) exceeded 180,000, with over 2,000 women enlisting per week. From "Wings On Her Shoulders", by Katharine Bentley Beauman, Late Fight Officer W.A.A.F. [Hutchinson & Co Ltd, London, New York, Melbourne, c1943]

© The Print Collector/Heritage Images