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Home > Images Dated > 2007 > September > 8 Sep 2007

Images Dated 8th September 2007

Choose from 231 pictures in our Images Dated 8th September 2007 collection for your Wall Art or Photo Gift. All professionally made for Quick Shipping.


Hongi Maori salutations, 1908-1909.Artist: JL Martin Featured 8 Sep 2007 Print

Hongi Maori salutations, 1908-1909.Artist: JL Martin

Hongi Maori salutations, 1908-1909. A Hongi is a traditional greeting in New Zealand. It is done by pressing one's nose to another person at an encounter. It is still used at traditional meetings among members of the Maori people and on major ceremonies. Through the exchange of this physical greeting, you are no longer considered manuhiri (visitor) but rather tangata whenua, one of the people of the land. For the remainder of your stay you are obliged to share in all the duties and responsibilities of the home people. In earlier times, this may have meant bearing arms in times of war, or tending crops of kumara (sweet potato). When Maori greet one another by pressing noses, the tradition of sharing the breath of life is considered to have come directly from the gods. From Penrose's Pictorial Annual 1908-1909, An Illustrated Review of the Graphic Arts, volume 14, edited by William Gamble and published by AW Penrose (London, 1908-1909)

© The Print Collector / Heritage-Images

Ballymaclinton, Irish village, Franco-British Exhibition, London, 1908.Artist: R Welch Featured 8 Sep 2007 Print

Ballymaclinton, Irish village, Franco-British Exhibition, London, 1908.Artist: R Welch

Ballymaclinton, Irish village, Franco-British Exhibition, London, 1908. The Franco-British Exhibition of 1908 celebrated the Entente Cordiale which had been signed by the United Kingdom and France in 1904. The fair was the largest exhibition of its kind in Britain, and the first international exhibition co-organised and sponsored by two countries. The most popular attractions at the exhibition were the two so-called colonial villages, an Irish village and a Senegalese village, which were designed to communicate the success of colonial imposition. The Irish village (Ballymaclinton) was inhabited by 150 colleens (Irish girls) who demonstrated various forms of domestic industry, as well as displays of manufacturing and even an art gallery. From Penrose's Pictorial Annual 1908-1909, An Illustrated Review of the Graphic Arts, volume 14, edited by William Gamble and published by AW Penrose (London, 1908-1909)

© The Print Collector / Heritage-Images

Myrna Loy (1905-1993), American actress, c1930s-c1940s Featured 8 Sep 2007 Print

Myrna Loy (1905-1993), American actress, c1930s-c1940s

Myrna Loy (1905-1993), American actress, c1930s-c1940s. Signrd photograph. Loy began her career playing bit parts in movies, among them the silent version of Ben-Hur (1926). She got her big break when she was cast in The Thin Man (1934), based on American writer Dashiell Hammett's novel. Her husband-and-wife sleuthing team with William Powell proved hugely popular and led to several sequels, and to her pairing with Powell in other films. In a 1936 poll she was voted queen of the movies'. Loy devoted the war years to working for the Red Cross, and made a return to the screen, in more matronly guise, in The Best Years of Our Lives (1946). Her subsequent film appearances were relatively infrequent, as she devoted much of her time to working for the United Nations agency UNESCO. She was presented with an honorary career achievement Academy Award in 1991

© The Print Collector / Heritage-Images