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Images Dated 20th March 2007

Available as Framed Prints, Photos, Wall Art and Gift Items

Choose from 64 pictures in our Images Dated 20th March 2007 collection for your Wall Art or Photo Gift. Popular choices include Framed Prints, Canvas Prints, Posters and Jigsaw Puzzles. All professionally made for quick delivery.


Featured 20 Mar 2007 Print

The Small Physicist and The Vain Physicist, 1887. Artist: Gaston Tissandier

The Small Physicist and The Vain Physicist, 1887. Published in History of Balloons by Gaston Tissandier, Paris, 1887

© Art Media / Heritage-Images

19th Century, Art Media, Balloon, Ballooning, Cartoon, Century, Clothes, Color, Colour, Concept, Costume, Country, Dress, Engraving, Female, France, French, Gaston, Gaston Tissandier, Guy, Hat, Job, Lady, Location, Male, Man, Men, Nineteenth Century, Occupation, People, Physicist, Print Collector4, Profession, Satire, Scientist, Tissandier, Vain, Vanity, Woman, Women

Featured 20 Mar 2007 Print

Balliol surrendering his crown to Edward I of England, 1296.Artist: J Rogers

Balliol surrendering his crown to Edward I of England, 1296. In 1292, Edward I was asked to arbitrate in the selection of the King of Scotland in order to prevent a dynastic war breaking out between rival claimants. John Balliol (1250-1314) emerged as the successful candidate. Edward, who had demanded to be recognised as Lord Paramount of Scotland as a condition of his agreeing to arbitrate, proceeded to treat Scotland as a vassal kingdom, humiliating Balliol. Finding the situation intolerable, Balliol raised an army and war broke out in 1296. Edward brutally sacked Berwick and then defeated the Scots at Dunbar, forcing Balliol to abdicate

© The Print Collector / Heritage-Images

Featured 20 Mar 2007 Print

SS 'Great Eastern', 1859. Artist: Unknown

SS 'Great Eastern', 1859. Pictured at the port of Le Havre, France. Isambard Kingdom Brunel proposed to the Eastern Steam Navigation Company the construction of a steamship five or six times the size of any then in use. It would use two forms of power: paddle-wheels and screw-engines. Constructed from iron at Millwall, London, between 1853 and 1858, the Great Eastern was the largest vessel afloat until she was broken up in 1888. Only in 1899 were her dimensions exceeded by the SS 'Oceanic'. The Great Eastern was not a success as a passenger vessel and was sold for a fraction of her building cost. She was used as a cable-laying ship, most notably laying the Transatlantic telegraph cable in 1865-1866

© Art Media / Heritage-Images