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Images Dated 24th August 2006

Available as Framed Prints, Photos, Wall Art and Gift Items

Choose from 285 pictures in our Images Dated 24th August 2006 collection for your Wall Art or Photo Gift. Popular choices include Framed Prints, Canvas Prints, Posters and Jigsaw Puzzles. All professionally made for quick delivery.


Featured 24 Aug 2006 Print

'On the Old Walls of Verdun', France, June 1916, (1926).Artist: Francois Flameng

'On the Old Walls of Verdun', June 1916, France, (1926). The Battle of Verdun was the longest and one of the bloodiest of the First World War. Although not captured by the Germans the city itself was heavily damaged by artillery bombardments during the battle

© The Print Collector / Heritage-Images

1910s, 1st World War, 20th Century, Art, Arts, Battle, Battle Of Verdun, Building, Buildings, Century, City, Concept, Country, Damaged, Debris, Debris, Destruction, Devastation, First World War, Flameng, France, Francois, Francois Flameng, French, Front, Guy, Location, Lorraine, Male, Man, Men, Meuse, Painting, People, Print Collector2, Rubble, Ruin, Ruined, Ruins, Soldier, Soldiers, Tgn, The Print Collector, Verdun, War, Wartime, Western Front, World War I, World War One, Ww1, Wwi

Featured 24 Aug 2006 Print

'Bombardment of Verdun with Incendiary Shells', France, 25-26 March 1916, (1926).Artist: Francois Flameng

'Bombardment of Verdun with Incendiary Shells', France, 25-26 March 1916, (1926). The Battle of Verdun was the longest and one of the bloodiest of the First World War. The Germans began their offensive on 21 February 1916. The strategic objective of their commander, Erich von Falkenhayn was to ''bleed the French Army white by committing them to a battle of attrition in a sector of the front they would be compelled to defend at all costs. Falkenhayn's grim logic was that with a population twice that of France, Germany could afford to lose two men to every one Frenchman, thus forcing them out of the war. After early successes with the French caught by surprise and with inadequate numbers of troops and artillery, the German advance was gradually halted by desperate counter-attacks. By 11 December the Germans had retreated to their original positions. Casualties were appalling; 434, 000 Germans and 550, 000 on the French side

© The Print Collector / Heritage-Images

Featured 24 Aug 2006 Print

Field Marshal Douglas Haig, British soldier and senior commander during World War I, (1926). Artist: Unknown

Field Marshal Douglas Haig, British soldier and senior commander during World War I, (1926). Haig (1861-1928) was commander of the 1st Army Corps of the British Expeditionary Force (BEF) at the outbreak of the war. His troops fought with distinction at Mons and the First Battle of Ypres. In 1915 Haig was promoted to Commander in Chief of the BEF, a post he held until the end of the war. His conduct of the war on the Western Front was controversial. On the one hand, his pursuit of a strategy of attrition and planning of offensives which ultimately made minimal territorial gains at the cost of massive casualties, as at the Somme (1916) and Passchendaele (1917), earned him the nickname 'Butcher Haig'. General John J Pershing, commander of the US army in France, described Haig as the man who won the war, however. He was made a Field Marshal in 1917, and after the war served as Commander-in-Chief of Home Forces until 1921

© The Print Collector / Heritage-Images