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Images Dated 2005

Available as Framed Prints, Photos, Wall Art and Gift Items

Choose from 8,312 pictures in our Images Dated 2005 collection for your Wall Art or Photo Gift. Popular choices include Framed Prints, Canvas Prints, Posters and Jigsaw Puzzles. All professionally made for quick delivery.


The New Jerusalem, c1900 Featured 2005 Print

The New Jerusalem, c1900

The New Jerusalem, c1900. Christ, who has redeemed the world through his Crucifixion, waits at the entrance to The New Jerusalem to welcome the saved, while those who have ignored his message and sacrifice go down to hell. Popular print

© Art Media / Heritage-Images

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Scene from A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens, 1843. Artist: John Leech Featured 2005 Print

Scene from A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens, 1843. Artist: John Leech

Scene from A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens, 1843. The irascible, curmudgeonly Ebenezer Scrooge, sitting alone on Christmas Eve, is visited by the ghost of Marley, his late business partner. The same night he is visited by three more apparitions, the ghosts of Christmas Past, Christmas Present and Christmas Future, whose revelations cause him to wake on Christmas Day a changed man. He sends a turkey to Bob Cratchit his clerk, thoroughly enjoys the festivities and becomes a kindly, jolly old man. From A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens. (London, 1843). This was the first in the series of five Christmas books Dickens published

© Ann Ronan Picture Library / Heritage-Images

Telescopic Philanthropy, 1865. Artist: John Tenniel Featured 2005 Print

Telescopic Philanthropy, 1865. Artist: John Tenniel

Telescopic Philanthropy, 1865. Little London Arab. Please M, Ain't We Black Enough to be Cared For? (With Mr. Punch's Compliments to Lord Stanley.) In his novel, Bleak House, Dickens had highlighted and satirised the growing numbers of the middle classes who expended much time, effort and money on raising funds to civilise (particularly black) foreign peoples, rather than concentrating on the problems of the poor at home. This telescopic philanthropy was epitomised by Mrs Jellyby in Bleak House, but here is represented by Britannia who has her eyes fixed so firmly on the distant horizon that she fails entirely to see the three children at her feet who, like Dickens Jo, represent the estimated 30, 000 homeless children living on the streets of London. From Punch, or the London Charivari, March 4, 1865

© The Print Collector / Heritage-Images