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Framed Pictures, Canvas Prints
Posters & Jigsaws since 2004

Trojan Wars Gallery

Available as Framed Photos, Canvas Prints, Wall Art and Gift Items

Choose from 38 pictures in our Trojan Wars collection for your Wall Art or Photo Gift. Popular choices include Framed Photos, Canvas Prints, Posters and Jigsaw Puzzles. All professionally made for quick delivery.


Greek vase painting of Achilles and Patroclus. Artist: Sosias Featured Print

Greek vase painting of Achilles and Patroclus. Artist: Sosias

A Greek vase painting of Achilles and Patroclus, where Achilles is binding the wounds of Patroclus. Currently in the Berlin Greek and Roman Museum

© CM Dixon / Heritage-Images

Achilles, Assistance, Binding, Cm, Cm Dixon, Color, Colour, Concept, Dixon, Friendship, Greece, Greek, Greek And Roman Museum, Greek Mythology, Health, Healthcare, Homeware, Mike Dixon, Museum, Mythology, Object, Patroclus, Sitting, Sosias, Tgn, Trojan Wars, Vase, Vase Painting, War, Warrior, Wound, Wounded

The Sacrifice of Polyxena, 1730s. Artist: Giovanni Battista Pittoni the Younger Featured Print

The Sacrifice of Polyxena, 1730s. Artist: Giovanni Battista Pittoni the Younger

The Sacrifice of Polyxena, 1730s. According th Greek Mythology, Polyxena was the youngest daughter of King Priam of Troy and his queen, Hecuba. She was killed as a sacrifice after the death of Achilles, who had cofided in her the secret of his sole vulnerability, his heel. Polyxena passed the information on to her brothers, Paris and Deiphobus, who were able to kill Achilles by shooting him in the heel with a poisoned arrow. Found in the collection of the State Hermitage, St Petersburg

© Fine Art Images

Trojans Deceived, 1830 Featured Print

Trojans Deceived, 1830

Trojans Deceived, 1830. The raiding party secreting themselves in the great wooden horse. The story of the legendary wars between the Greek confederation and Troy, part of which is the subject of Homer's epic poem the Iliad where it is said to have lasted ten years, has some historical basis. Virgil, in his epic poem the Aeneid, writes of the end of the siege of Troy and tells of the huge wooden horse which Ulysses had built. It was left outside the walls of Troy and the Trojans were convinced it was a Greek offering to the gods for their safe voyage back to Greece. Instead, it was full of Greek warriors who, when the horse was dragged into Troy, waited until night, climbed down and opened the gates of the city and let in the Greek army. From The World Displayed by the Rev Royal Robbins. (New York, 1830)

© Ann Ronan Picture Library / Heritage-Images