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Framed Pictures, Canvas Prints
Posters & Jigsaws since 2004
 

Textiles Gallery

Available as Framed Prints, Photos, Wall Art and Gift Items

Choose from 470 pictures in our Textiles collection for your Wall Art or Photo Gift. Popular choices include Framed Prints, Canvas Prints, Posters and Jigsaw Puzzles. All professionally made for quick delivery.


Featured Print

The death of Harold at the Battle of Hastings, 1066, (1944). Creator: Unknown

The death of Harold at the Battle of Hastings, 1066, (1944). The Latin reads: 'Harold Rex Interfectus Est' - King Harold is killed. English forces led by King Harold II fought the invading Normans under William I. It has been suggested that the 'arrow in the eye' account of Harold's death was deliberately invented by the Normans as an attempt to legitimise William's siezure of the English crown, by portraying Harold as having been 'struck down' by God as punishment for his breaking of his oath to William. Detail from the Bayeux Tapestry, the famous embroidery made a few years after the Norman invasion of England in 1066. From "Battlefields in Britain', by C. V. Wedgwood. [Collins, London, 1944]

© The Print Collector/Heritage Images

Featured Print

Italian Renaissance lace, (1898). Creator: Unknown

Italian Renaissance lace, (1898). 'Figs 1, 2 and 3: Venetian point lace. Figs 4, 5 and 6: Venetian point lace in relief. Figs 7 and 8: Venetian point lace in relief with highly raised leaves. Fig 9: Roselina-lace. Fig 10: Reticella-lace. Fig 11: Italian Guipure. Fig 12: Genoa church-lace. Fig 13: Collar in Venetian Guipure...The art of lace-making, unknown to the ancients, and no doubt, not brought to artistic perfection previously to the close of the 15th century, may truly be called a creation of the Renaissance. And it is the soil of Italy, principally the two cities of Venice and Genoa, to which we owe the needle-made lace as well as the finest kind of pillow-lace. The former (the so-called point) is to be considered as the more precious kind. The method of making it - ground and ornament consisting of nothing but an infinity of stitches made a jour - admits of an extremely delicate and graceful formation. But its execution requires a very complicated and difficult process, as only small pieces of about 10 cm dimension can be made at a time, which, after being done, must be joined so as to form a complete whole, for which reason, in designing the patterns, the possibility of a scarcely visible joining of the several parts must be taken into account'. Plate 50 from "The Historic Styles of Ornament" translated from the German of H. Dolmetsch. [B.T. Batford, London, 1898]

© The Print Collector/Heritage Images

Featured Print

Medieval weaving, embroidery, enamel and painted sculpture, (1898). Creator: Unknown

Medieval weaving, embroidery, enamel and painted sculpture, (1898). 'Fig 1: Statue of St. Simon in the choir of Cologne Cathedral. Fig 2: Pattern on the robe of another statue ibid. Fig 3: Embroidered fonder of French origin. 14th century. Fig 4: Embroidered stuff (in the original, silver is employed instead of gold), 15th century. Fig 5: Embroidered stuff, 14th century. Figs 6-9: Borders and patterns of carpets from the wall-paintings in the upper church S. Francesco at Assisi. 14th century. Fig 10: Pattern of a carpet from a tempera-painting of Niccolo Alunno (1466) in the pinacotheca at Perugia. Fig 11: Sicilian weaving from St. Mary's church at Danzig, 13th century. Fig 12: Border of a carpet on the painting of Hugo van der Goes in the Palazzo degli Uffizi at Florence, 15th century. Fig 13: Border of a carpet on a picture of [by?] Mantegna in S. Zeno at Verona, late 15th century. Fig 14: Border from an embroidered chasuble, 14th century (German work). Figs 15 and 16: Patterns of stuffs from the 14th century, of French origin. Fig 17: Gilt copper-engraving from the cross-relics-table in the catholic parish-church at Mettlach. Figs 18-20: Enamelled decorations on the shrine of the Three Kings in Cologne Cathedral, early 13th century. Fig 21: Enamelled border in the Musee de Cluny, early 13th century'. Plate 42 from "The Historic Styles of Ornament" translated from the German of H. Dolmetsch. [B.T. Batford, London, 1898]

© The Print Collector/Heritage Images