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Framed Pictures, Canvas Prints
Posters & Jigsaws since 2004

Steam Locomotive Gallery

Available as Framed Photos, Canvas Prints, Wall Art and Gift Items

Choose from 245 pictures in our Steam Locomotive collection for your Wall Art or Photo Gift. Popular choices include Framed Photos, Canvas Prints, Posters and Jigsaw Puzzles. All professionally made for quick delivery.


Junction of the Great Western Railway with the London Branch, 1844. Creator: Unknown Featured Print

Junction of the Great Western Railway with the London Branch, 1844. Creator: Unknown

Junction of the Great Western Railway with the London Branch, 1844. Two signal-posts of great size, and conspicuous for their markings and colour, have been placed on the left of the up line, in the angle formed by the junction of the two lines. One of these posts - a very tall one - is devoted to the use of the Great Western Line; and the other - a short one - to the use of the West London'. The signals ...are so arranged that the one is made to work relatively with the other. Thus, when the full face of the cross bar of the branch post is turned full on the line, giving warning "To Stop," the position of the round board above it gives signal of "All Clear" to the main line, and so on. Meantime the tall post makes its own signal of "All Clear" to the main line, and "Stop" to the branch one. At night these signals are made by lights'. From "Illustrated London News", 1844, Vol V

© The Print Collector/Heritage Images

A Blenkinsop Locomotive at a Yorkshire Colliery, 1814, (1945). Creator: Unknown Featured Print

A Blenkinsop Locomotive at a Yorkshire Colliery, 1814, (1945). Creator: Unknown

A Blenkinsop Locomotive at a Yorkshire Colliery, 1814, (1945). Man smoking a pipe, and a Blenkinsop steam locomotive at Middleton colliery near Leeds, West Yorkshire. Mining engineer and inventor John Blenkinsop (1783-1831) designed the first practicable steam locomotive, the Salamanca, in 1812. It operated by means of a rack and pinion system. Richard Trevithick had built a steam locomotive in 1805 for Wylam colliery, but it had been too heavy for the cast iron rails it was meant to run on. Middleton colliery laid iron edge rails, which were stronger than those used at Wylam. Blenkinsop went on to build three further locomotives for the colliery, which carried on operating on the railway into the 1830s. In the meantime, further improvements in rail design meant that heavier adhesion locomotives could be used, superseding Blenkinsop's rack and pinion engines. From "British Railways", by Arthur Elton. [Collins, London, 1945]

© The Print Collector/Heritage Images

Travelling on the Liverpool and Machester Railway, 1831, (1945). Creator: SG Hughes Featured Print

Travelling on the Liverpool and Machester Railway, 1831, (1945). Creator: SG Hughes

Travelling on the Liverpool and Machester Railway, 1831, (1945). Steam locomotives on the Liverpool & Manchester Railway (L&MR), which first opened in 1830 under the supervision of its chief engineer, George Stephenson. The first train is the locomotive Jupiter hauling first class covered carriages and a mail coach. Below, the locomotive North Star hauls open-topped second class carriages. From "British Railways", by Arthur Elton. [Collins, London, 1945]

© The Print Collector/Heritage Images