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Sir Joseph Wilson Swan Gallery

Available as Prints and Gift Items

Choose from 9 pictures in our Sir Joseph Wilson Swan collection for your Wall Art or Photo Gift. All professionally made for Quick Shipping.


Joseph Wilson Swan, British physicist and chemist, demonstrating electromagnetism, 1889
Joseph Wilson Swan, British physicist and chemist, demonstrating electromagnetism, 1889
Full Range of Prints and Gifts in Stock
The Ediswan Pointolite, c1916
The Ediswan Pointolite, c1916
Full Range of Prints and Gifts in Stock
The First Incandescent Electric Lamp, c1916
The First Incandescent Electric Lamp, c1916
Full Range of Prints and Gifts in Stock
Sir Joseph Swan (1828-1914), English physicist and chemist, 1911-1912
Sir Joseph Swan (1828-1914), English physicist and chemist, 1911-1912
Full Range of Prints and Gifts in Stock
Advertisement for Ediswan incandescent light bulbs, 1898
Advertisement for Ediswan incandescent light bulbs, 1898
Full Range of Prints and Gifts in Stock
Sir Joseph Wilson Swan, scientist and inventor, c1900
Sir Joseph Wilson Swan, scientist and inventor, c1900
Full Range of Prints and Gifts in Stock
Savoy Theatre, London, 1881
Savoy Theatre, London, 1881
Full Range of Prints and Gifts in Stock
Joseph Wilson Swan, c1880
Joseph Wilson Swan, c1880
Full Range of Prints and Gifts in Stock
Street in Newcastle Upon Tyne lit by Swan incandescent electric lamps, 1883
Street in Newcastle Upon Tyne lit by Swan incandescent electric lamps, 1883
Full Range of Prints and Gifts in Stock
Joseph Wilson Swan, British physicist and chemist, demonstrating electromagnetism, 1889 Featured Print

Joseph Wilson Swan, British physicist and chemist, demonstrating electromagnetism, 1889

Joseph Wilson Swan, British physicist and chemist, demonstrating electromagnetism, 1889. Swan (1828-1914) was the inventor of bromide paper for photography and of an incandescent light bulb. He is shown here at a Royal Society Conversazione, on 8 May 1889, demonstrating that a metal ring wound with a coil of wire rotates in the Earth's magnetic field when a small electric current is applied. From The Illustrated London News. (London, 1889). (Colorised black and white print)

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