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Parliamentary Reform Gallery

Available as Prints and Gift Items

Choose from 10 pictures in our Parliamentary Reform collection for your Wall Art or Photo Gift. All professionally made for Quick Shipping.


The New Parliament Pudding or John Bull's Treat, ca. 1832. Creator: Unknown
The New Parliament Pudding or John Bull's Treat, ca. 1832. Creator: Unknown
Full Range of Prints and Gifts in Stock
Oliver Cromwell 1599-1658. - Gemalde von Schrader, 1934
Oliver Cromwell 1599-1658. - Gemalde von Schrader, 1934
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The Massacre of Peterloo, or Britons Strike Home, 1819 (1904).Artist: George Cruikshank
The Massacre of Peterloo, or Britons Strike Home, 1819 (1904).Artist: George Cruikshank
Full Range of Prints and Gifts in Stock
Peterloo Massacre, Manchester, 16 August 1819
Peterloo Massacre, Manchester, 16 August 1819
Full Range of Prints and Gifts in Stock
Peterloo Massacre, Manchester, England, 16 August 1819
Peterloo Massacre, Manchester, England, 16 August 1819
Full Range of Prints and Gifts in Stock
Pudding before Meat, 1866. Artist: John Tenniel
Pudding before Meat, 1866. Artist: John Tenniel
Full Range of Prints and Gifts in Stock
The Reform Bill, 1866. Frantic Excitement!!!, 1866. Artist: John Tenniel
The Reform Bill, 1866. Frantic Excitement!!!, 1866. Artist: John Tenniel
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Going Down to the House, 1866. Artist: John Tenniel
Going Down to the House, 1866. Artist: John Tenniel
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The Officious Passenger, 1866. Artist: John Tenniel
The Officious Passenger, 1866. Artist: John Tenniel
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The Reform Janus, 1860
The Reform Janus, 1860
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Pudding before Meat, 1866. Artist: John Tenniel Featured Image

Pudding before Meat, 1866. Artist: John Tenniel

Pudding before Meat, 1866. Earl Gr-v-n-r exclaims Why, John! Beef before Pudding! Dizzy adds Ha! Ha! What an Absurd Idea! Lord Russell lifts the lid on the meat dish, with butler Gladstone at the rear bringing in the covered dish of redistribution. The Conservative, Disraeli, who had long been a supporter of parliamentary reform, is seated at the right of the picture. Lord Russell, the Liberal Prime Minister, had recently introduced a bill for parliamentary reform. However, he was met with opposition from his own party, chiefly in the form of attacks by Mr Robert Lowe who objected strongly to placing more power in the hands of the lower classes. Further Liberal objections concerned the separation of Franchise and Redistribution'. Earl Grosvenor (on the left) felt that before the reduction of the franchise could be meaningfully debated, the House should have details of the scheme for the redistribution of seats. In debates on this bill, however, Disraeli spoke very powerfully against the government and, when it became clear that the government could not win this battle, the Russell administration resigned. From Punch, or the London Charivari, March 31, 1866

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