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Framed Pictures, Canvas Prints
Posters & Jigsaws since 2004

Military Manoeuvres Gallery

Available as Framed Prints, Photos, Wall Art and Gift Items

Choose from 33 pictures in our Military Manoeuvres collection for your Wall Art or Photo Gift. Popular choices include Framed Prints, Canvas Prints, Posters and Jigsaw Puzzles. All professionally made for quick delivery.


The Imperial Guard Manoeuvring in the Presence of the Two Emperors at Tilsit, 28 June 1807, (c1850) Featured Print

The Imperial Guard Manoeuvring in the Presence of the Two Emperors at Tilsit, 28 June 1807, (c1850)

The Imperial Guard Manoeuvring in the Presence of the Two Emperors at Tilsit, 28 June 1807, (c1850). On 25 June 1807, Napoleon and Alexander I of Russia met on a raft in the middle of the river Neman in Russia to conclude the Treaty of Tilsit. The treaty marked the end of the War of the Fourth Coalition in which Prussia, Saxony and Russia fought unsuccessfully against France. The Germans were decisively defeated at the Battles of Jena and Auerstadt, while Napoleon routed the Russians at Friedland. Print from a series depicting the campaigns of Napoleon I, published c1850.

© The Print Collector / Heritage-Images

Marconi Shares Scandal, 1913. Artist: Leonard Raven-Hill Featured Print

Marconi Shares Scandal, 1913. Artist: Leonard Raven-Hill

Marconi Shares Scandal, 1913. In 1911 the British government decided to award a contract to the Marconi Wireless Telegraph Company to erect state-owned radio stations across the British Empire. Although the contract was not made public, Marconi shares rose from £2.43 in 1911 to £9 in April 1912. Members of the government were accused of dealing in the shares on the London Stock Exchange using private political information. The share dealing scandal nearly brought about Lloyd George's ruin. In 1913 a parliamentary enquiry found the ministers may have acted thoughtlessly, carelessly or mistakenly, but that they had acted innocently, honestly and openly. Captain Feddup is using the same words to excuse his failure on an army exercise. Cartoon from Punch. (London, 1913).

© Oxford Science Archive / Heritage-Images