Skip to main content
Prints, Framed, Posters, Cards, Puzzles, Canvas, Fine Art, Housewares, Mounted, Metal
Heritage Prints & Wall Art

sales@mediastorehouse.com
Tel: (678) 701-8254

Mathematical Instrument Gallery

Available as Prints and Gift Items

Large compass from a drafting took kit used by John S. Chase, mid-late 20th century Featured Image

Large compass from a drafting took kit used by John S. Chase, mid-late 20th century

Large compass from a drafting tool kit used by architect John S. Chase. Chase (1925-2012) was the first licensed African-American architect in the state of Texas, and the first African-American to serve on the U.S. Commission of Fine Arts. The metal compass has a grooved handle and adjustable circle at the top. The hinge is attached to two (2) legs. There is a central wheel between the legs. The bottom of one leg has a metal needle point. The other has a lower hinged tip with a screw closure. A piece of graphite is secured at the bottom of the leg. One leg is engraved with [K & E CO / GERMANY]

© Heritage Art/Heritage Images

Lieut. E. R. G. R. Evans Surveying With The Four-Inch Theodolite, October 1911, (1913) Featured Image

Lieut. E. R. G. R. Evans Surveying With The Four-Inch Theodolite, October 1911, (1913)

Lieut. E. R. G. R. Evans Surveying With The Four-Inch Theodolite Which Was Used To Locate The South Pole, October 1911, (1913). Lieutenant Edward Evans (1881-1957), expedition second in command, and Captain of the Terra Nova'. The final expedition of British Antarctic explorer Captain Robert Falcon Scott (1868-1912) left London on 1 June 1910 bound for the South Pole. The Terra Nova Expedition, officially the British Antarctic Expedition (1910-1913), included a geologist, a zoologist, a surgeon, a photographer, an engineer, a ski expert, a meteorologist and a physicist among others. Scott wished to continue the scientific work that he had begun when leading the Discovery Expedition to the Antarctic in 1901-04. He also wanted to be the first to reach the geographic South Pole. Scott, accompanied by Dr Edward Wilson, Captain Lawrence Oates, Lieutenant Henry Bowers and Petty Officer Edgar Evans, reached the Pole on 17 January 1912, only to find that the Norwegian expedition under Amundsen had beaten them to their objective by a month. Delayed by blizzards, and running out of supplies, Scott and the remainder of his team died at the end of March. Their bodies and diaries were found eight months later. From Scott's Last Expedition, Volume II. [Smith, Elder & Co. London, 1913]

© The Print Collector / Heritage-Images

Five inch theodolite, 1866
favorite_border

Five inch theodolite, 1866
Elevation of Troughtons dividing engine, 18th century, (1886) Featured Image

Elevation of Troughtons dividing engine, 18th century, (1886)

Elevation of Troughton's dividing engine, 18th century, (1886). Until the 1770s, scales on scientific instruments had been marked out by skilled craftsmen in a process called dividing, this was partly mechanized from the 1770s when dividing engines were introduced. Originally used on small instruments, by the 1850s they were used to graduate scales on large astronomical telescopes, making hand-dividing obsolete. This particular example was completed by John Troughton, and is similar to the first successful dividing engine which was completed in about 1775 by Jesse Ramsden. Illustration from Cyclopaedia of Useful Arts, Mechanical and Chemical, Manufactures, Mining, and Engineering, by Charles Tomlinson, Volume I, (James S Virtue, London, 1886)

© The Print Collector / Heritage-Images


Choose from 59 pictures in our Mathematical Instrument collection for your Wall Art or Photo Gift

Prints, Framed, Posters, Cards, Puzzles, Canvas, Fine Art, Housewares, Mounted, Metal...

Professionally Made for Quick Shipping