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Framed Pictures, Canvas Prints
Posters & Jigsaws since 2004

Industrial Revolution Gallery

Available as Framed Prints, Photos, Wall Art and Gift Items

Choose from 258 pictures in our Industrial Revolution collection for your Wall Art or Photo Gift. Popular choices include Framed Prints, Canvas Prints, Posters and Jigsaw Puzzles. All professionally made for quick delivery.


A Blenkinsop Locomotive at a Yorkshire Colliery, 1814, (1945). Creator: Unknown Featured Print

A Blenkinsop Locomotive at a Yorkshire Colliery, 1814, (1945). Creator: Unknown

A Blenkinsop Locomotive at a Yorkshire Colliery, 1814, (1945). Man smoking a pipe, and a Blenkinsop steam locomotive at Middleton colliery near Leeds, West Yorkshire. Mining engineer and inventor John Blenkinsop (1783-1831) designed the first practicable steam locomotive, the Salamanca, in 1812. It operated by means of a rack and pinion system. Richard Trevithick had built a steam locomotive in 1805 for Wylam colliery, but it had been too heavy for the cast iron rails it was meant to run on. Middleton colliery laid iron edge rails, which were stronger than those used at Wylam. Blenkinsop went on to build three further locomotives for the colliery, which carried on operating on the railway into the 1830s. In the meantime, further improvements in rail design meant that heavier adhesion locomotives could be used, superseding Blenkinsop's rack and pinion engines. From "British Railways", by Arthur Elton. [Collins, London, 1945]

© The Print Collector/Heritage Images

Scenes on the North Branch of the Susquehanna, 1874. Creator: James H. Richardson Featured Print

Scenes on the North Branch of the Susquehanna, 1874. Creator: James H. Richardson

Scenes on the North Branch of the Susquehanna, 1874. ...the furnace on Hunlocks Creek, Nanticoke ferry, Danville, the hemlock-gatherers,
the stone-quarry, etc'. Tree-felling, logging, quarrying and mining along the North Branch of the Susquehanna River, Pennsylvania, USA. ...the prevailing industry is mining, all the mountains here containing iron-ore. There is some considerable difficulty in floating down logs to the main stream of the Susquehanna below Clearfield, and most of the timber cut is used for the purpose of smelting or for forges, where the charcoal hammered iron is made...we come to a rough, irregular stone structure, black as ink, and surrounded by rudely-arranged scaffolding of a peculiar form. This is a coal-mine, or rather all that can be seen externally of it. Of iron-furnaces there are many, and of rolling-mills more than a few'. From "Picturesque America; or, The Land We Live In, A Delineation by Pen and Pencil of the Mountains, Rivers, Lakes...with Illustrations on Steel and Wood by Eminent American Artists" Vol. II, edited by William Cullen Bryant. [D. Appleton and Company, New York, 1874]

© The Print Collector/Heritage Images

The Queen in her Bridal Dress, 1840. Creator: William Henry Mote Featured Print

The Queen in her Bridal Dress, 1840. Creator: William Henry Mote

The Queen in her Bridal Dress, 1840. Portrait of Victoria, Queen of Great Britain and Ireland (1819-1901) wearing her lace-trimmed wedding dress and veil. She chose handmade Honiton lace in order to stimulate and support the English lace industry which had been in decline due to the advent of machine lace, causing widespread poverty and unemployment among skilled artisans. Victoria married Prince Albert in the Chapel Royal at St James's Palace, Westminster, London, on 10 February 1840. [John Tallis & Company, London & New York]

© The Print Collector/Heritage Images