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Charles I and Speaker Lenthall, c1850, (1947). Creator: Unknown Featured Image

Charles I and Speaker Lenthall, c1850, (1947). Creator: Unknown

Charles I and Speaker Lenthall, c1850, (1947). On 4 January 1642, King Charles I (1600-1649, standing, in hat) entered the House of Commons to arrest five Members of Parliament for high treason. Speaker William Lenthall (1591-1662) defied the King to uphold the privileges of Parliament. The King had to leave without arresting the Five Members. No monarch has entered the House of Commons since then. After Speaker Lenthall Asserting the Privileges of the Commons Against Charles I when the Attempt was made to Seize the Five Members, painting by Charles West Cope in the Palace of Westminster in London. From "The House of Commons", by Martin Lindsay M.P. [Collins, London, 1947]

© The Print Collector/Heritage Images

The Vigil, c1884, (1938). Artist: John Pettie Featured Image

The Vigil, c1884, (1938). Artist: John Pettie

The Vigil, c1884. The Vigil of Arms was one of the religious exercises, which in the Middle Ages preceded the conferment of knighthood. The artist James Watt was the model for the knight; the background was taken from St Bartholomew?s Church in Smithfield. Painting held at the Tate Britain, London. From World-Famous Paintings edited by J. Greig Pirie [W. & G. Foyle, Ltd, London, 1938.]

© The Print Collector

Euston Station, London terminus of London and Birmingham Railway, 1840 Featured Image

Euston Station, London terminus of London and Birmingham Railway, 1840

Euston Station, London terminus of London and Birmingham Railway, 1840. A man greets a female passenger while luggage on the cariage roof is untied. Iron pillars and trusses support the station roof. In 1833, Robert Stephenson (1803-1859) was appointed chief engineer of the London & Birmingham Railway (LBR), the first railway into London. Running between Curzon Street Station, Birmingham, and Euston Station, London, the 112 mile long line took 20, 000 men nearly five years to build, at a cost of five and a half million pounds. The LBR opened on 17 September 1838. From London and Birmingham Railway Guide. (London, 1840)

© Oxford Science Archive / Heritage-Images


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