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Framed Pictures, Canvas Prints
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Ice Gallery

Available as Framed Prints, Photos, Wall Art and Gift Items

Choose from 367 pictures in our Ice collection for your Wall Art or Photo Gift. Popular choices include Framed Prints, Canvas Prints, Posters and Jigsaw Puzzles. All professionally made for quick delivery.


Liner in a field of ice, and people waiting for news of the 'Titanic' disaster, April 20, 1912 Featured Print

Liner in a field of ice, and people waiting for news of the 'Titanic' disaster, April 20, 1912

Liner in a field of ice, and people waiting for news of the 'Titanic' disaster, April 20, 1912. 'A Liner Threading Her Way Through a Field of Ice in the North Atlantic', and 'The Hours of Awful Suspense in London' - relatives and friends at the White Star Line offices at Oceanic House, Cockspur Street. The White Star Line ship RMS 'Titanic' struck an iceberg in thick fog off Newfoundland on 14 April 1912. She was the largest and most luxurious ocean liner of her time, and thought to be unsinkable. In the collision, five of her watertight compartments were compromised and she sank. Out of the 2228 people on board, only 705 survived. A major cause of the loss of life was the insufficient number of lifeboats she carried. Page 14, from "Titanic In Memoriam Number", a special supplement in "The Daily Graphic" newspaper issued following the sinking of the 'Titanic' on 15 April 1912, published on 20 April 1912.

© The Print Collector / Heritage-Images

'Ice Crystals Formed on the Line of a Fish Trap', c1908, (1909). Artist: Unknown Featured Print

'Ice Crystals Formed on the Line of a Fish Trap', c1908, (1909). Artist: Unknown

'Ice Crystals Formed on the Line of a Fish Trap', c1908, (1909). Anglo-Irish explorer Ernest Shackleton (1874-1922) made three expeditions to the Antarctic. During the second expedition, 1907-1909, he and three companions established a new record, Farthest South latitude at 88°S, only 97 geographical miles (112 statute miles, or 180 km) from the South Pole, the largest advance to the pole in exploration history. Members of his team also climbed Mount Erebus, the most active volcano in the Antarctic. Shackleton was knighted by King Edward VII for these achievements. He died during his third and last 'oceanographic and sub-antarctic' expedition, aged 47. Illustration from The Heart of the Antarctic, Vol. I, by E. H. Shackleton, C.V.O. [William Heinemann, London, 1909]

© The Print Collector / Heritage-Images

'The Nimrod Held Up in the Ice', 1908, (1909). Artist: Unknown Featured Print

'The Nimrod Held Up in the Ice', 1908, (1909). Artist: Unknown

'The Nimrod Held Up in the Ice', 1908, (1909). View over ice looking towards the bows of the sailing ship 'Nimrod' with foresail and upper top set moving into heavy pack ice. Men stand on the bowsprit, shrouds and yard. Anglo-Irish explorer Ernest Shackleton (1874-1922) made three expeditions to the Antarctic. During the second expedition, 1907-1909, he and three companions established a new record, Farthest South latitude at 88°S, only 97 geographical miles (112 statute miles, or 180 km) from the South Pole, the largest advance to the pole in exploration history. Members of his team also climbed Mount Erebus, the most active volcano in the Antarctic. Shackleton was knighted by King Edward VII for these achievements. He died during his third and last 'oceanographic and sub-antarctic' expedition, aged 47. Illustration from The Heart of the Antarctic, Vol. I, by E. H. Shackleton, C.V.O. [William Heinemann, London, 1909]

© The Print Collector / Heritage-Images