sales@mediastorehouse.co.uk
Framed Pictures, Canvas Prints
Posters & Jigsaws since 2004
 

Hans Holbein Gallery

Available as Framed Prints, Photos, Wall Art and Gift Items

Choose from 246 pictures in our Hans Holbein collection for your Wall Art or Photo Gift. Popular choices include Framed Prints, Canvas Prints, Posters and Jigsaw Puzzles. All professionally made for quick delivery.


Featured Print

Terminus, the Device of Erasmus, c. 1532. Creator: Hans Holbein (German, 1497/98-1543)

Terminus, the Device of Erasmus, c. 1532. In the spirit of the Italian Renaissance, Erasmus of Rotterdam (c. 1466-1536), the celebrated Dutch humanist and scholar, embraced ancient Greek and Roman literature and incorporated much of its moral and ethical messages into his own work. Holbein here conflates Erasmus's features with Terminus, the Roman god of boundaries, who defied Jupiter by maintaining his position atop Capitoline Hill. Erasmus adopted Terminus, along with the motto concedo nulli (I concede to no one), as a personal symbol for devotion and steadfastness.

© Heritage Art/Heritage Images

Featured Print

Dance of Death: The Sailor, c. 1526. Creator: Hans Holbein (German, 1497/98-1543)

Dance of Death: The Sailor, c. 1526. Dance of Death is the most celebrated series of woodcuts designed by Holbein. The forty-one blocks were cut by Hans Lutzelburger in the years immediately before his death in 1526, though the set was not published until 1538. Dance of Death originated as a drama in the middle of the 14th century. Following widespread epidemics such as the black plague, these plays took place in a cemetery or churchyard. Actors, dressed in pale costumes painted to resemble skeletons, personified Death and summoned a group of people from all social classes in a dancelike procession. In a period when the life span was short, the purpose of the Dance of Death was to remind the populace to prepare for the Last Judgement.

© Heritage Art/Heritage Images

Featured Print

Dance of Death: The Child, c. 1526. Creator: Hans Holbein (German, 1497/98-1543)

Dance of Death: The Child, c. 1526. Dance of Death is the most celebrated series of woodcuts designed by Holbein. The forty-one blocks were cut by Hans Lutzelburger in the years immediately before his death in 1526, though the set was not published until 1538. Dance of Death originated as a drama in the middle of the 14th century. Following widespread epidemics such as the black plague, these plays took place in a cemetery or churchyard. Actors, dressed in pale costumes painted to resemble skeletons, personified Death and summoned a group of people from all social classes in a dancelike procession. In a period when the life span was short, the purpose of the Dance of Death was to remind the populace to prepare for the Last Judgement.

© Heritage Art/Heritage Images