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Framed Pictures, Canvas Prints
Posters & Jigsaws since 2004

French Religious Wars Gallery

Available as Framed Prints, Photos, Wall Art and Gift Items

Choose from 46 pictures in our French Religious Wars collection for your Wall Art or Photo Gift. Popular choices include Framed Prints, Canvas Prints, Posters and Jigsaw Puzzles. All professionally made for quick delivery.


Henry I, Duke of Guise, 1580, and Francis de Montmorency, 1576 (1882-1884) Featured Print

Henry I, Duke of Guise, 1580, and Francis de Montmorency, 1576 (1882-1884)

Henry I, Duke of Guise, 1580, and Francis de Montmorency, 1576 (1882-1884). Guise as a general of infantry, and Montmorency as Marshal of France. Henry (1550-1588) was the founder of the Catholic League and a prominent figure on the Catholic side in the French Wars of Religion. He was one of the instigators of the St Bartholomew's Day Massacre of Protestants in 1572. The Montmorency family were rivals of the Guises. Francis (1530-1579) was made a Marshal of France in 1559. He was a cousin of Gaspard de Coligny, the Protestant leader killed in the St Bartholomew's Day Massacre. He was appointed to court by King Charles IX in 1574 but was compelled to leave due to the hatred between himself and Guise. A print from La France et les Francais a Travers les Siecles, Volume III, F Roy editor, A Challamel, Saint-Antoine, 1882-1884

© The Print Collector / Heritage-Images

Francis of Lorraine, 2nd Duke of Guise, French soldier and politician, 16th century (1882-1884).Artist: Micheler Featured Print

Francis of Lorraine, 2nd Duke of Guise, French soldier and politician, 16th century (1882-1884).Artist: Micheler

Francis of Lorraine, 2nd Duke of Guise, French soldier and politician, 16th century (1882-1884). Francis, Duke of Guise (1519-1563) was created Grand Chamberlain of France in 1551. The following year he earned renown for successfully defending the city of Metz against the invading army of the Emperor Charles V and in 1558 captured Calais, the last remaining English possession in France. After Francis II became King of France in 1559, Guise and his brother Charles, Cardinal of Lorraine, became the most powerful figures on the royal council. The period from 1560 onwards saw increasing tensions between Catholics and Protestants in France, and a botched attempt to kidnap the staunchly Catholic Guises sparked a series of assassinations and counter-assassinations. After the accession of the young Charles IX to the throne, the regent Catherine de Medici seemed inclined to favour the Protestant cause, leading Francis to take a prominent role at the head of the Catholic faction. A massacre of Protestants took place at Wassy-sur-Blaise on 1st March 1562 when Francis was present, provoking what would become known as the French Wars of Religion. He was assassinated by a Huguenot whilst besieging the city of Orleans in February 1563. A print from La France et les Francais a Travers les Siecles, Volume III, F Roy editor, A Challamel, Saint-Antoine, 1882-1884

© The Print Collector / Heritage-Images

St Bartholomews Day Massacre, Paris, 24 August 1572 Featured Print

St Bartholomews Day Massacre, Paris, 24 August 1572

St Bartholomew's Day Massacre, Paris, August 1572. The massacre occurred after a failed attempt by the powerful Catholic Guise family to murder the Huguenot (Protestant) leader Gaspard de Coligny (1519-1572). On 22 August 1572, Coligny was shot but only wounded (bottom left). Fearing that her part in approving the plot would be discovered, Catherine de Medici, mother of King Charles IX, who is shown playing tennis (top left), ordered the killing of the Huguenot leaders, who were gathered in Paris for the wedding of the future King Henry IV. The massacre began on 24 August 1572, and the Huguenot leaders, including Coligny, shown (right) being murdered in bed and his body thrown out of a window, were killed. Afterwards, the massacre spread to ordinary Huguenots, initially in Paris, but later across much of the country, with Catholic mobs murdering tens of thousands of Protestants

© Ann Ronan Picture Library / Heritage-Images