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Framed Pictures, Canvas Prints
Posters & Jigsaws since 2004

Francisco De Goya Gallery

Available as Framed Prints, Photos, Wall Art and Gift Items

Choose from 380 pictures in our Francisco De Goya collection for your Wall Art or Photo Gift. Popular choices include Framed Prints, Canvas Prints, Posters and Jigsaw Puzzles. All professionally made for quick delivery.


Woman Reading to Two Children, 1824-1825. Creator: Francisco de Goya (Spanish, 1746-1828) Featured Print

Woman Reading to Two Children, 1824-1825. Creator: Francisco de Goya (Spanish, 1746-1828)

Woman Reading to Two Children, 1824-1825. Goya left Spain in 1824 to escape the repressive rule of King Ferdinand VII and settled in Bordeaux, France, where he met Gaulon, an expert lithographer. Working with him, Goya executed Woman Reading to Two Children , where he drew densely with a crayon and then scratched out fine highlights on the woman's arm, skirt, mantilla, and around her head. An onlooker described Goya's methods, "Usually he covered the whole stone with a uniform gray tone and then removed with the scraper those parts which were to appear light. . . . Next the crayon was again employed to strengthen the shadows, the accents." Goya's portrayal of the children's rapt attention and the tranquil figure of the young woman suggests that this charming domestic scene was observed by the artist in his own home. Goya was joined in Bordeaux by his companion Leocadia Weiss and her two younger children, Guillermo and Maria del Rosario. Only seven impressions of this lithograph are known, all of which are now in museum collections

© Heritage Art/Heritage Images

The Proverbs: If Marion Will Dance, Then She Has to Take the Consequences, 1864. Creator Featured Print

The Proverbs: If Marion Will Dance, Then She Has to Take the Consequences, 1864. Creator

The Proverbs: If Marion Will Dance, Then She Has to Take the Consequences, 1864. The freewheeling, lascivious dancers in Goya's composion keep time with castanets, pairs of shellshaped wooden clappers attached to the thumb and index finger. The erotic connotations of castanets dated from antiquity, when they were depicted in vase paintings in association with the cult of the goddess Cybele and the Dionysian rites. According to Martin Mersenne's treatise, Les Preludes de l'harmonie universelle (1636), castanets were used to accompany the saraband, a fast folk dance considered disreputable in 16th century Spain. Although by the time the saraband reached the French court in the 17th century, it had become a slow, serious, processional dance, Goya refers here to the dance's earlier, erotic origins

© Heritage Art/Heritage Images

The Caprichos: A Bad Night, 1799. Creator: Francisco de Goya (Spanish, 1746-1828) Featured Print

The Caprichos: A Bad Night, 1799. Creator: Francisco de Goya (Spanish, 1746-1828)

The Caprichos: A Bad Night, 1799. A Bad Night is from Los Caprichos (Caprices), a set of 80 prints that satirize the vices and follies of contemporary Spanish society. Goya explored the themes of superstition and sensuality, greed and violence, and immorality and deceit practiced by men and women who appear alternately as aggressors and victims. He parodied ignorance and studipity as well as the corruption of the church and government. Goya exploited aquatint to create a dramatic contrast of light and shade through the biting and burnishing of richly textured or velvet-smooth aquatint grains. He thus expressed the opposing forces of enlightenment and ignorance, reason and the irrational world, and suggested an atmosphere of violence and doom, best illustrated in the trial proofs like this one, printed before the first edition

© Heritage Art/Heritage Images