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Framed Pictures, Canvas Prints
Posters & Jigsaws since 2004

Crowds Gallery

Available as Framed Prints, Photos, Wall Art and Gift Items

Choose from 334 pictures in our Crowds collection for your Wall Art or Photo Gift. Popular choices include Framed Prints, Canvas Prints, Posters and Jigsaw Puzzles. All professionally made for quick delivery.


Mr. Emidy driving 28 horses to Greenwich, 1844. Creator: Unknown Featured Print

Mr. Emidy driving 28 horses to Greenwich, 1844. Creator: Unknown

Mr. Emidy driving 28 horses to Greenwich, 1844. Extraordinary Feat of Driving... Mr Emidy, "master of the horse" to Mr. Batty, the proprietor of "Astley's Amphitheatre," undertook for a wager to drive 14 pair, or 28 horses, from Westminster-road to Greenwich and back, in the space ot two hours and a half. The novelty of the bet gathered crowds of spectators in the neighbourhood of the theatre, and throughout the line of road. Precisely at five minutes to one o'clock, two outriders, mounted on handsome piebald palfreys, started from the theatre. They were immediately followed by 28 horses, driven by Mr. Emidy, and drawing a car, containing a large party of persons connected with the amphitheatre: there were also two other outriders, on white horses, right and left, to keep the horses in order. They started at a steady pace up the York-road, whence they turned down Waterloo-road, proceeded thence to the London-road, and onward to Greenwich. Mr. Emidy appeared to have no difficulty whatever in the management of the horses, but held the reins with as much ease and confidence as an omnibus driver would with his single pair. Not the slightest accident occurred, with the exception of the breaking of the traces; and at twenty minutes past three o'clock (five minutes within the allotted time) the carriage returned to the doors of Astley's Theatre. The locality of our sketch is close to the "Elephant and Castle," on the return from Greenwich'. From "Illustrated London News", 1844, Vol I

© The Print Collector/Heritage Images

Scene in Privy Gardens, Whitehall, on Sunday last, 27 April 1844. Creator: Unknown Featured Print

Scene in Privy Gardens, Whitehall, on Sunday last, 27 April 1844. Creator: Unknown

Scene in Privy Gardens, Whitehall, on Sunday last, 27 April 1844. ...considerable alarm was occasioned in various parts of Westminster by the appearance of a cow, which had escaped from its owners...and which, being followed by a crowd of boys, was driven to madness, indiscriminately attacking all those who attempted to oppose its course. For nearly two hours did the wretched animal attempt to outrun its pursuers...the poor cow, then nearly exhausted, ran down Parliament-street, towards the Treasury, at which time there could not have been less than 2000 persons following it, shouting and hallooing in a disgraceful manner. Avoiding Whitehall, the poor beast turned into Privy-gardens, and finding the garden-gate of the Premier (Sir Robert Peel) standing open, immediately took refuge therein, to the no small alarm of the attendants in the hall'. From "Illustrated London News", 1844, Vol I

© The Print Collector/Heritage Images

Mr. O'Connell, in his triumphal car, 1844. Creator: Unknown Featured Print

Mr. O'Connell, in his triumphal car, 1844. Creator: Unknown

Mr. O'Connell, in his triumphal car, 1844. Crowds in Dublin, Ireland, celebrate the release from prison of nationalist politician. At length Mr. O'Connell...[was] seen ascending the triumphal car; and then came forth a shout, so loud, so long, so vehement, and so enthusiastic, that even the man of firmest nerve must for the moment have felt himself shaken by it. Wherever the eye could reach upon the space beneath it, was occupied by a human being, and each and all were sending forth a peal of acclamation. The shout of those in front of the prison was caught up along the whole line of procession, and for at least five minutes the air seemed to be rent with a thunderburst of joyful cheerings, that came reverberating back upon the utterers, making every heart beat quicker, and every eye glance brighter'. From "Illustrated London News", 1844, Vol I

© The Print Collector/Heritage Images