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Framed Pictures, Canvas Prints
Posters & Jigsaws since 2004

Civil Engineering Gallery

Available as Framed Photos, Canvas Prints, Wall Art and Gift Items

Choose from 200 pictures in our Civil Engineering collection for your Wall Art or Photo Gift. Popular choices include Framed Photos, Canvas Prints, Posters and Jigsaw Puzzles. All professionally made for quick delivery.


The Earl of Bandon cutting the first turf for the Cork and Bandon Railway, 1845 Featured Print

The Earl of Bandon cutting the first turf for the Cork and Bandon Railway, 1845

The Earl of Bandon cutting the first turf for the Cork and Bandon Railway, 1845. James Bernard, 2nd Earl of Bandon, takes part in a ceremony marking the start of railway construction in Ireland. The turf had previously been loosened by a labourer, and a plank laid down, upon which the whee barrow was to be driven. His Lordship took the spade and drove it into the yielding earth, amidst a mighty shout from the people; he then flung some spadesful into the barrow, and rolled it along the plank, amidst renewed shouts and increased pressure from the crowd; and thus was the Cork and Bandon Railway commenced! From "Illustrated London News", 1845, Vol VII

© The Print Collector/Heritage Images

Driving the Tunnel for the Waterloo and City Railway, (c1897). Artist: E&S Woodbury Featured Print

Driving the Tunnel for the Waterloo and City Railway, (c1897). Artist: E&S Woodbury

Driving the Tunnel for the Waterloo and City Railway, (c1897). Scene underground during excavations for London's transport system. The illustration represents the shield which protects the excavators. This is from time to time driven forward, and another section of the iron lining of the tunnel is inserted piece by piece between it and the sections already completed. Compressed air is used in that portion of the tunnel which is beneath the river to prevent the water entering. The Blackwall Tunnel, opened by the Prince of Wales on 22 May 1897, was constructed similarly. From Sixty Years A Queen: The Story of Her Majesty's Reign, by Sir Herbert Maxwell. [Harmsworth Bros, Limited, London, c1897]

© The Print Collector / Heritage-Images

James Brindley, 18th century English civil engineer and canal builder, (1836). Artist: JT Wedgwood Featured Print

James Brindley, 18th century English civil engineer and canal builder, (1836). Artist: JT Wedgwood

James Brindley, 18th century English civil engineer and canal builder, (1836). Brindley (1716-1772) rests a hand on a theodolite and points to the aqueduct over the Irwell on the Worsley to Manchester (Bridgewater) canal. He became an engineer, inventing a water engine for draining a coalmine in 1752. In 1759, after seeing Brindley's design for a silk mill, Francis Egerton, the Duke of Bridgewater, employed him to build the canal between Worsley and Manchester. After its completion in 1772, he went on to build the Grand Trunk, Birmingham and Chesterfield canals. Although illiterate all his life, Brindley constructed 365 miles of canals. Engraving after a portrait by Francis Parsons (fl1763-1783). (Colorised black and white print)

© The Print Collector