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Brentford Gallery

Available as Prints and Gift Items

Choose from 6 pictures in our Brentford collection for your Wall Art or Photo Gift. All professionally made for Quick Shipping.


Swan-Upping on the Thames, from Brentford Ait, 1844. Creator: Unknown
Swan-Upping on the Thames, from Brentford Ait, 1844. Creator: Unknown
Full Range of Prints and Gifts in Stock
Old Houses at Brentford, 19th century? Creator: Unknown
Old Houses at Brentford, 19th century? Creator: Unknown
Full Range of Prints and Gifts in Stock
Pushing a Monkey Boat Through The Lock at Brentford, c1935. Creator: Unknown
Pushing a Monkey Boat Through The Lock at Brentford, c1935. Creator: Unknown
Full Range of Prints and Gifts in Stock
Brentford, c1910
Brentford, c1910
Full Range of Prints and Gifts in Stock
The Taylor riding to Brentford, 1768.Artist: TS Stayner
The Taylor riding to Brentford, 1768.Artist: TS Stayner
Full Range of Prints and Gifts in Stock
William Joynson-Hicks, 1st Viscount Brentford, British statesman, 1926. Artist: Alick P F Ritchie
William Joynson-Hicks, 1st Viscount Brentford, British statesman, 1926. Artist: Alick P F Ritchie
Full Range of Prints and Gifts in Stock
Swan-Upping on the Thames, from Brentford Ait, 1844. Creator: Unknown Featured Image

Swan-Upping on the Thames, from Brentford Ait, 1844. Creator: Unknown

Swan-Upping on the Thames, from Brentford Ait, 1844. Annual event in which mute swans on the River Thames in west London are rounded up, caught, ringed, and then released. The procedure is carried out by members of the the London guilds. In the Thames, at present, the greatest number of swans belong to the Queen, and the Companies of Vintners and Dyers own the next largest proportion; but the birds are far less numerous than they used to be. They are marked upon the upper mandible with a knife or other sharp instrument. The "Swan-upping", or "Swan-hopping", as it is vulgarly termed, is the catching and taking up the swans to mark the cygnets, and renew that on the old birds, if obliterated, in the presence of the royal swan herdsman...'. From "Illustrated London News", 1844, Vol V

© The Print Collector/Heritage Images