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Mother Julian, 1912
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Mother Julian, 1912
A Factoryscape in the Potteries, (1938) Featured Image

A Factoryscape in the Potteries, (1938)

A Factoryscape in the Potteries, (1938). Smoke from chimneys in the industrial area known as the Staffordshire Potteries, Stoke-on-Trent. Due to the local availability of clay and coal, North Staffordshire became a centre of ceramic production in the early 17th century. Illustration from A History of Everyday Things in England - Done in four parts of which this is the third. The Rise of Industrialism 1733-1851, by Marjorie and C. D. B. Quennell. [B. T. Batsford Ltd. London, 1938]

© The Print Collector / Heritage-Images

The Bookworm, 1850
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The Bookworm, 1850
Scene from A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens, 1843. Artist: John Leech Featured Image

Scene from A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens, 1843. Artist: John Leech

Scene from A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens, 1843. The irascible, curmudgeonly Ebenezer Scrooge, sitting alone on Christmas Eve, is visited by the ghost of Marley, his late business partner. The same night he is visited by three more apparitions, the ghosts of Christmas Past, Christmas Present and Christmas Future, whose revelations cause him to wake on Christmas Day a changed man. He sends a turkey to Bob Cratchit his clerk, thoroughly enjoys the festivities and becomes a kindly, jolly old man. From A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens. (London, 1843). This was the first in the series of five Christmas books Dickens published

© Ann Ronan Picture Library / Heritage-Images

Posters warning those guilty of illegal oaths were liable to deportation, (1834), 1934 Featured Image

Posters warning those guilty of illegal oaths were liable to deportation, (1834), 1934

Posters warning that people found guilty of uttering illegal oaths were liable to deportation, 1834. On 24th February 1834 local landowners in Dorset put up posters warning that people found guilty of uttering illegal oaths were liable to deportation. The Tolpuddle Martyrs were a group of 19th century agricultural labourers from Dorset who were convicted of swearing a secret oath as members of the Friendly Society of Agricultural Labourers. The rules of the society show it was clearly structured as a friendly society and operated as a trade-specific benefit society. But at the time, friendly societies had strong elements of what would now be considered trade unions. Before 1824/25 the Combination Acts had outlawed combining or organising to gain better working conditions. The Tolpuddle Martyrs were subsequently sentenced to transportation to Australia. Their convictions caused public outcry and 800, 000 signatures were collected for their release. The march organised by thier supporters was one of the first successful political marches in the UK, and all, except James Hammett (who had a previous criminal record for theft) were released in 1836. From The Book of The Martyrs of Tolpuddle: 1834-1934, published by The Trades Union Congress General Council, 1934

© The Print Collector

Plan of Bremenium, 1902
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Plan of Bremenium, 1902

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