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Ames Research Center Gallery

Available as Prints and Gift Items

Choose from 7 pictures in our Ames Research Center collection for your Wall Art or Photo Gift. All professionally made for Quick Shipping.


Model of the torus colony, c1970s. Creator: NASA
Model of the torus colony, c1970s. Creator: NASA
Full Range of Prints and Gifts in Stock
Godfrey, Cooper and DeFrance on the Ramp, 1948. Creator: NASA
Godfrey, Cooper and DeFrance on the Ramp, 1948. Creator: NASA
Full Range of Prints and Gifts in Stock
Fred Drinkwater congratulating Neil Armstrong, California, USA, February 1964
Fred Drinkwater congratulating Neil Armstrong, California, USA, February 1964
Full Range of Prints and Gifts in Stock
Bell X-14A Vertical Take-off and Landing aircraft, USA, 1962. Creator: NASA
Bell X-14A Vertical Take-off and Landing aircraft, USA, 1962. Creator: NASA
Full Range of Prints and Gifts in Stock
Model, Space Shuttle, Delta-Wing High Cross-Range Orbiter Concept, 1970s-2000s
Model, Space Shuttle, Delta-Wing High Cross-Range Orbiter Concept, 1970s-2000s
Full Range of Prints and Gifts in Stock
Model, Space Shuttle, Straight-Wing Low Cross-Range Orbiter Concept, 1970s-2000s
Model, Space Shuttle, Straight-Wing Low Cross-Range Orbiter Concept, 1970s-2000s
Full Range of Prints and Gifts in Stock
The world's largest wind tunnel, Ames Aeronautical Laboratory, Moffett Field, California
The world's largest wind tunnel, Ames Aeronautical Laboratory, Moffett Field, California
Full Range of Prints and Gifts in Stock
The world's largest wind tunnel, Ames Aeronautical Laboratory, Moffett Field, California Featured Image

The world's largest wind tunnel, Ames Aeronautical Laboratory, Moffett Field, California

The world's largest wind tunnel, Ames Aeronautical Laboratory, Moffett Field, California, USA, 1947. 40 x 80 foot wind tunnel which, when built, was the world's largest. The camera is stationed in the tunnel's largest section, 173 feet wide by 132 feet high. Here at top speed the air, driven by six 40 foot fans, is moving about 35 to 40 miles per hour. The rapid contraction of the throat (or nozzle) speeds up this air flow to more than 250 miles per hour in the oval test section, which is 80 feet wide and 40 feet high. The tunnel encloses 900 tons of air, 40 tons of which rush through the throat per second at maximum speed. The experimental model seen here is almost 50 feet long. Embodying a sharply swept-back wing suitable for supersonic flight, it is undergoing tests designed to improve the landing characteristics of this type of airfoil. Mounted on struts connected to scales under the test section, it is "flown standing still" while each element such as lift and drag is measured and air pressures occurring across the wing are recorded. Information gathered from such tests were made available to the nation's aircraft manufacturers by the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (now NASA)

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