Skip to main content
sales@mediastorehouse.co.uk
Framed Pictures, Canvas Prints
Posters & Jigsaws since 2004

Trending

Choose a picture from our Trending collection for your Wall Art or Photo Gift. Popular choices include Framed Photos, Canvas Prints, Posters and Jigsaw Puzzles. All professionally made for quick delivery.


The Fighting Temeraire, 1839. Artist: JMW Turner Featured Print

The Fighting Temeraire, 1839. Artist: JMW Turner

The Fighting Temeraire, 1839. The 98-gun ship Temeraire became known as the Fighting Temeraire after its role in Nelson's victory at the Battle of Trafalgar in 1805. The ship remained in service until 1838 when she was decommissioned. The painting was thought to represent the decline of Britain's naval power. The Temeraire is shown travelling east, away from the sunset, to evoke a sense of loss. Original work found in The National Gallery Collection. From World Famous Paintings edited by J Grieg Pirie [W.& G. Foyle Ltd., London, 1938.]

© The Print Collector

Layla and Majnun in the wilderness with animals, from a Khamsa (Quintet)..., c. 1590-1600 Featured Print

Layla and Majnun in the wilderness with animals, from a Khamsa (Quintet)..., c. 1590-1600

Layla and Majnun in the wilderness with animals, from a Khamsa (Quintet) of Amir Khusrau Dihlavi, c. 1590-1600. Nestled in the multicoloured rocks are the reunited lovers Layla and Majnun, forced by society to remain separated for years. Majnun's name means "madman," since the separation drove him past the brink of sanity. Exiling himself to the wilderness, he became emaciated. When Layla found him after a prophetic dream, the wild animals gathered around, drawn to the purity and depth of their love. This painting illustrates a version of the story as told by an Indian author who wrote in Persian. He altered the ending given by previous Persian authors to the ancient Bedouin tale that originated among nomadic tribes of the Arabian Peninsula, in which Layla dies before the couple can be physically reunited

© Heritage Art/Heritage Images

Gin Lane, 1751. Artist: William Hogarth Featured Print

Gin Lane, 1751. Artist: William Hogarth

Gin Lane, 1751.The scene is the St Giles slums. A child falls to its death from the arms of its drunk mother who sits with ulcerated legs. A skeletal figure holds an empty glass. Goods are being pawned in order to buy gin, a baby is being fed with gin, a corpse is put into a coffin in the background.The pawnbroker, distiller and undertaker are the only well-off and successful people in the neighbourhood. Third of four states of plate. This print was published in support of a campaign directed against gin drinking among London's poor. Consumption of cheap spirits by the poor had soared in the early eighteenth century, with dire social consequences. Gin inspires violence and careless inebriation. Addiction to spirits leads to negligence, poverty and death

© London Metropolitan Archives (City of London) / Heritage-Images